When Should We Do Our Neighborhood Spring Clean Up?Also… Got Crime? Come talk with SPD this week – 3/27

Highland Park Way Clean Up

When Should We Schedule HPAC’s Neighborhood Spring Clean Up?
Take our poll for the picking the best date!

  • This spring we will be tackling the trash along Highland Park Way and SW Holden St.
  • Trash Bags and Grabbers will be provided – bring work gloves if you have them.
  • Refreshments will be provided!
  • Does your child need service hours? This is great opportunity!
  • We also encourage neighbors to host block and traffic circle clean ups that afternoon.

HPAC Meeting with SPD this Weds 3/27/2019

Doors open at 6:30 – Meeting from 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Agenda Includes:

6:30p Neighbor Networking

7:00p Welcome from HPAC Chair

7:05p Community Announcements

  • HPIC
  • Other

7:10p Update from Lt. Strand from SPD on crimes stats in Highland Park
7:15p Presentation on Crime Prevention and Block Watch Network by Jennifer Danner, Crime Prevention Coordinator, SPD

Crime Prevention Coordinators are experts in crime prevention techniques. Jennifer will talk about outgoing crime problems in your neighborhood, getting involved in Block Watch and present on crime prevention tips.

8:00p HPAC Executive Committee Updates

  • Discussion of Developing Neighborhood Coalition with South Delridge and Riverview
  • Election for Treasurer
  • Next steps on Roundabout Funding
  • Myers Way/ Camp Second Chance
  • “Your Voice, Your Choice” submitted projects
  • Save the Date for Spring Neighborhood Clean Up – April or May?
  • Any New Orders of Business

8:30p Meeting Adjourn

Next Meeting – April 24th 
Tentative: SDOT Presentation on:

  • 16th Ave SW and SW Holden Intersection Improvements
  • Olsen Place Safety Improvements

HPAC March 27th Meeting: Presentation on Crime Prevention and Block Watch Network from SPD

All HPAC meetings are held at the Highland Park Improvement Club, 1116 SW Holden St. Seattle, WA 98106 on the 4th Wednesday of the month (from Jan – June & Sept – October) Doors open at 6:30 – Meeting from 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Agenda as follows:

6:30p Neighbor Networking

7:00p Welcome from HPAC Chair

7:05p Community Announcements

  • HPIC
  • Other

7:10p Update from Lt. Strand from SPD on crimes stats in Highland Park

7:15p Presentation on Crime Prevention and Block Watch Network by Jennifer Danner, Crime Prevention Coordinator, SPD

Crime Prevention Coordinators are experts in crime prevention techniques. Jennifer will talk about outgoing crime problems in your neighborhood, getting involved in Block Watch and present on crime prevention tips.

8:00p HPAC Executive Committee Updates

  • Discussion of Developing Neighborhood Coalition with South Delridge and Riverview
  • Election for Treasurer
  • Next steps on Roundabout Funding
  • Myers Way/ Camp Second Chance
  • “Your Voice, Your Choice” submitted projects
  • Save the Date for Spring Neighborhood Clean Up – April 14th
  • Any New Orders of Business

8:30p Meeting Adjourn

Next Meeting – April 24th
Tentative: SDOT Presentation on:

  • 16th Ave SW and SW Holden Intersection Improvements
  • Olsen Place Safety Improvements

Highland Park Neighborhood Clean Up
This Spring TBD

  • This spring we will be tackling the trash along Highland Park Way and SW Holden St.!
  • Trash Bags and Grabbers will be provided – bring work gloves if you have them.
  • Refreshments will be provided!
  • Does your child need service hours? This is great opportunity!
  • We also encourage neighbors to host block and traffic circle clean ups from 12 -2p that afternoon.

Your Voice, Your Choice
Help review and score ideas for park and street improvements
You are invited to review the park and street improvement ideas submitted by the public for Your Voice, Your Choice: Parks & Streets. Get involved by attending one or more of the project development meetings throughout the city. Participants will be responsible for evaluating the project ideas that are submitted and give each project numerical ratings.

Project Development has been slightly delayed and will now take place from April 1 – 30, 2019.  

  • There will be opportunities to participate in Project Development meetings in each Council District. Participants will be responsible for evaluating the project ideas that are submitted and give each project numerical ratings.
  • Each Project Development meeting will be supported by Your Voice, Your Choice staff who will ensure that community members have the necessary resources and tools to evaluate projects.
  • Anyone can participate in Project Development if they live, work, go to school, receive services, volunteer, or have a connection to the City of Seattle.
  • Project lists will be divided geographically within Council Districts. We will provide information in advance on which lists will be discussed at which meetings.

If you cannot attend a meeting, but would like to evaluate projects, there will be an opportunity to do so online. See City Webpage for more info.

Your Voice, Your Choice Project Development Meetings
DISTRICT 1

April 8, 5:30pm – 7:30pm
Delridge Community Center

April 9, 5:30pm – 7:30pm
South Park Community Center

April 9, 5:30pm – 7:30pm
Southwest Branch Library

April 11, 5:30pm – 7:30pm
West Seattle Branch Library

Highland Park Action Committee’s response for permit extension for Camp Second Chance (CSC)

March 4, 2019

Jason Johnson, Interim Director
Department of Human Services
City of Seattle
Seattle Municipal Tower – 58th fl.
700 Fifth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98124-421

Re:  Camp Second Chance permit extension

Director Johnson:

In response to requests that Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC) support a permit extension for Camp Second Chance (CSC) at the camp’s current location at 9701 Myers Way South in the West Seattle neighborhood of Highland Park, HPAC’s executive committee considered the matter and has come to the decision, supported by our membership, not to endorse or advocate for another permit extension at the Myers Way location. 

Also contributing to this decision is the input from residents of other neighborhoods near Camp Second Chance, including unincorporated King County, Highline, Top Hat, and White Center.

We did not come to this decision easily. We know that homelessness is an urgent issue that affects our neighbors and our communities.

In order to understand the wishes of our neighborhood and unincorporated neighborhoods that surround the CSC site now, HPAC has gone through another significant community engagement process over the last few months.

In December 2018, HPAC leadership received three emails requesting that HPAC support a permit extension for Camp Second Chance at the existing Myers Way location.  Requests were from Cinda Stenger, a lay leader at Alki UCC and CSC Community Advisory Committee member, from S. Denise Henrikson, a volunteer at Camp Second Chance and member of Westside Interfaith Network (WIN), and from Martin Westerman, Director of Seattle Green Spaces Coalition (SGSC).

This prompted HPAC’s leadership to hold a listening session at our January 23, 2019 meeting to understand the wishes of neighbors, stakeholders, community groups, and businesses in order to inform HPAC’s response to the permit extension. Over 40 people attended, with a significant number of the attendees being from Camp Second Chance. Opening and closing statements were made by Eric Davis, Camp Second Chance Manager, Martin Westerman, Director of Seattle Green Spaces Coalition (SGSC), Cinda Stenger, a lay leader at Alki UCC on the Camp Second Chance Community Advisory Committee, Barbara Dobkin, a leader with North Highline Unincorporated Area Council, and me, Gunner Scott, acting chair of HPAC.

What we came away with was that Camp Second Chance has been a model encampment, particularly for individuals working on their sobriety, and there was support for the encampment in the room.  There was also opposition, most strenuously expressed by residents living closest to CSC who are the most negatively affected by CSC and the unsanctioned camps, RVs, and rubbish collecting around the area.

Many spoke about the City not honoring repeated requests to deal with those unsanctioned encampments, RVs, and rubbish accumulations that increased significantly over the last two years since Camp Second Chance was established. RVs were originally staged on Myers Way in 2015 for the RV safe lot that did not happen, but were allowed to remain while the attendant issues with trash, broken furniture, and car parts strewn along Myers Way were not addressed adequately or timely.  

Despite continual requests from HPAC since 2016 for enforcement action against unsanctioned encampments and RVs, it was only 3 months ago that the greenbelt between SR-509 and Myers Way was cleared, including removal of 190 tons of trash. 

Another matter is the ongoing lack of coordination between SPD and the King County Sheriff’s office when law enforcement issues arise in the Myers Way area.  In 2016, HPAC requested a memorandum of understanding between SPD and King County, however, that request is still unfulfilled according to the memo dated Feb 26, 2019 from Jackie St. Louis, Unsheltered Crisis Response:

“Request Summary

Request 3 – an MOA or some agreement to address the jurisdictional issues between Seattle Police and the King County Sheriff’s office, is a work product that we’ve desired for a long time.  I want to thank George for scheduling meeting last October {2016} with the King County Sheriff, SPD, and KC Councilmembers McDermott and Fitzgibbon, and Deputy KC Exec Fred Jarrett.  But if we could *formalize* what came out of that meeting, I think that would be useful.

Status

George Scarola led during that time the community engagement for the City’s unsheltered homeless response. In the Myers Way neighborhood George brought together community to discuss a range of issues which included law enforcement and safety.

We confirmed with George that the October [2016] meeting did not happen in the configuration described above. We do know that the topic was discussed at several community meetings with representatives from SPD and the King County Sheriff’s office. During those meetings both SPD and King County 911 dispatch relayed that from their experience calls are efficiently routed. The experience of community is that reporting crime and requesting help on the border is clunky and confusing.

We cannot confirm action around creating a MOU.”

Additionally, how future unsanctioned encampments, RVs, rubbish clean up, and law enforcement will be handled and by whom remains unclear and unresolved.

In addition to our community listening session, we also provided an anonymous survey to which the Highland Park / Riverview community responded and informed the HPAC executive committee of the community’s position on the CSC permit extension request.

Of those surveyed and living in the Highland Park / Riverview neighborhoods, of which HPAC represents, 57% did not support an extension for Camp Second Chance at the Myers Way location.

Survey respondent comments included:

“It is time for another neighborhood to host. No one neighborhood should have to shoulder the burden. The concept of this camp can be moved to another location.”

“Hosting should be a shared responsibility by all neighborhoods in the city and the timeline should be respected for all neighborhoods hosting.”

“The illegal encampment and RV surrounding the area should be considered as issues deriving from the authorized encampment. They should be addressed effectively before any extension. Also, it is unfair for the neighborhood to host an encampment for so long.”

“Do not let the City set a precedent of perpetually extending any camp’s stay at one location. The City should keep their promise to the surrounding neighborhoods. The goal is to get C2C residents HOUSED.”

Of those respondents supporting the CSC permit extension, the majority (58%) were residents located beyond the neighborhoods immediately around the Myers Way site.

Comments included:

“This is a model community that is working and changing people’s lives.”

“Camp Second Chance is seen as a model in addressing the housing crisis – it provides people with safety and community within the constraints of RV living. The fact is people are homeless and live how they can – if there’s a model that works well until this crisis is solved, I think it should be supported. That said, the other residents near Camp Second Chance need to be supported by police and other infrastructure to minimize impacts on their lives and property by unsanctioned homeless”

We also agree that Camp Second Chance appears to be a model that works when there is no other option, but an outdoor tents/sheds encampment is not ideal. The model also highlights the need for more peer-led sober transitional living programs.

But we feel that this “support’ for Camp Second Chance remaining at Myers Way is actually best summed up in the letter sent from Martin Westerman, Director of Seattle Greenspaces Coalition:

“Our SGSC question is, what conditions would HPIC/HPAC need satisfied to keep the camp there?  Moving it to another West Seattle location may only create the same challenges we’re facing now.  My impression is that, intentionally or reluctantly, CSC draws homeless folk seeking food and drink, and thereby attracts unauthorized homeless campers to the forest.  Are there other factors at play for you and other neighbors?  Rather than repeat the problems in another West Seattle location, we’d like to solve them at Myers.”

Over the past 10 years, Highland Park has hosted three encampments (Nickelsville on two occasions and Camp Second Chance since 2016) and in 2015 served as a staging area for a proposed safe lot for individuals residing in recreational vehicles. Additionally, the presence of RVs along Myers Way Southwest and the surrounding neighborhood has not been adequately addressed, and those RVs attract more derelict vehicles of all kinds.

This burden has impacted not only our neighborhood, but the neighborhoods immediately south of us along the city limit. No other neighborhood in Seattle has willingly or unwillingly taken on as much and to the same extent.

Although Camp Second Chance has been sanctioned by the City since 2017, it has actually been located in the neighborhood for the last 2 years and 8 months when it moved from Riverton Park United Methodist Church in Tukwila to Myers Way on or about July 18, 2016, as reported by Camp Second Chance to the West Seattle blog:

“Until July 18, the camp had a legal site at Riverton Park United Methodist Church in Tukwila. They were there for three months, as per their agreement with the church, and have been invited to move back there in January. However, they were unable to find another host site in time, and they wanted to honor their three month agreement with the church, so they have moved to a Seattle city owned lot that has been unused and vacant for several years. They are continuing to search for a new permitted site sponsored by a religious organization and plan to move as soon as they have located one.”[1]

After 8 months of being an unsanctioned encampment at the Myers Way site, the City of Seattle officially permitted the site in March 2017. On June 7, 2018, the Human Services Department extended the permit allowing Camp Second Chance to remain at 9701 Myers Way South for an additional 12 months, until March 2019. 

We agree with sentiment from the 2015 Director’s Report Transitional Encampment Interim Use Amendments:

“…to permit transitional encampments for homeless individuals as an interim use…”

Therefore, the Highland Park Action Committee requests:

  1. That the City of Seattle honor its commitment to our neighbors in the area and follow the law;

    1. City of Seattle’s Ordinance 124747 only allows a sanctioned encampment at a site for up to two years, and then a 12 month minimum lapse is required before another encampment can be located on the same site.  
    1. Accordingly, Camp Second Chance must be relocated to another site by the end March 2019, but not in any part of the Highland Park area including Myers Way or any another location in the South Delridge area
    1. A 3-year moratorium on any future encampments in our neighborhood is also requested.
  • That Camp Second Chance remain the same model at a new location; and,

  • That the Myers Way parcel be moved into the Seattle Parks Dept portfolio this year to be land banked.

If the City does not honor the law, then the City is doing a disservice now and setting a precedent for future negotiations.  Other neighborhoods as well will not embrace a sanctioned encampment knowing that the City of Seattle does not honor its commitments.

As we have previously mentioned in other letters regarding sanctioning of encampments or RV lots in our neighborhood, HPAC’s position remains that Highland Park has disproportionately borne the responsibility of accommodating the city’s responses to homelessness, hosting 3 large encampments and absorbing the increase in related crime over the preceding decade.

Since 2016, the Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC) has sought resolution from the City of Seattle and specifically the Human Services Department on a number of items including:

1) The adoption of a set of best practices (manifested as our “Neighborhood Protocols for Sanctioned Encampments” which have been provided to the department on many past occasions and are again enclosed below) by which the City of Seattle will abide prior to sanctioning an encampment in any given neighborhood.

2) That the Finance and Administrative Services Department accelerate the relinquishment of the Myers Way Parcels to the Department of Parks and Recreation.

3) A plan resolving jurisdictional issues that arise from the presence of sanctioned and unsanctioned encampments at the interface of city, unincorporated county, and state land.

4) A 10% increase in the number of police officers assigned to the Southwest Precinct Patrol to help mitigate the increased burden on our current resources. (At 124 Full-Time Equivalents for budget year 2018, the Southwest Precinct Patrol Budget Control Level is the lowest in the city.)

Three years have passed and to date, NONE of these requests have been enacted or fully acknowledge. Instead, the methods that City agencies have employed have lacked transparency, accountability, and eroded neighborhood trust in City government.

As a reminder in 2007, Highland Park and Myers Way were both identified as potential sites for a jail, which the neighborhood was not in favor of and organized against. Later in 2008, the first Nickelsville encampment started in Highland Park at the Glass Yard site. It was eventually moved, but then returned in 2011 where it grew too large and unmanageable. 

There is a long documented history of the City either being unable or unwilling to address the safety concerns including: from not being able to evict the problem campers from Nickelsville, to those who were evicted moving into the Greenbelt across the street, to increase in petty crime in the neighborhood. Some neighbors expressed feeling trapped in an unsafe situation and ignored by City officials during the time Nickelsville was in Highland Park. All sentiments echoed by the current situation on Myers Way from the unsanctioned encampments to the RVs.

It cannot be stressed enough that Highland Park continues to suffer from a historical lack of public investment and our neighborhood has seen no commensurate redress while we have hosted these encampments.

I welcome any questions and we look forward to seeing a swift plan for Camp Second Chance’s relocation by the end of the month.

Sincerely,

Gunner Scott

Chair

hpacchair@gmail.com

CC: Mayor Jenny A. Durkan
Seattle City Council Members

 homelessness@seattle.gov


[1] UPDATE: New encampment on Myers Way: ‘Camp Second Chance’, West Seattle Blog, Accessed 2/20/2019 https://westseattleblog.com/2016/07/new-encampment-on-myers-way-camp-second-chance/

Join HPAC in Supporting Councilmember Lisa Herbold’s Anti-Displacement Ordinance

HPAC urges our neighbors to support the Anti-Displacement Ordinance that would authorize additional displacement mitigations for housing projects located in South Park, Rainier Beach, Othello, Bitter Lake, and Westwood-Highland Park. These neighborhoods have been identified as having a high risk of displacement and low access to opportunity, according to Growth and Equity: Analyzing Impacts on Displacement and Opportunity Related to Seattle’s Growth Strategy, in the Comprehensive Plan Seattle 2035, an analysis conducted by the Office of Planning and Community Development.

Councilmember Herbold has requested that the Council hear this bill concurrently with the MHA Citywide legislation.

“This ordinance would use authority granted under the State Environmental Protection Act (SEPA) to create a requirement for developers to mitigate the impacts resulting from the loss of affordable housing in those areas of the city that, if we didn’t do so, the result would be a failure to fulfill our obligation to ‘affirmatively promote fair housing’ — in other words, in areas where disproportionate displacement of communities of color and other protected classes is likely to occur,” Herbold said

See full Press Release

If you plan on testifying on MHA, we ask you ask the council to support the Anti-Displacement Ordinance

Tonight is the Last Seattle City Council Hearing on Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA)
Thursday, February 21st
5:30 PM – Council Chambers, City Hall, 600 4th Ave. Seattle 
We suggest folks arrive at least an hour early to sign up to testify. 

Agenda
Please Note: Times listed are estimated
A. Call To Order
B. Chair’s Report (5 minutes)
C. Items of Business Public Hearing for Items 1 – 3: CB 119443, CB 119444, and CB 119445 
http://www.seattle.gov/council/committees/citywidemha 

If you are unable to attend, please send comments to Committee Chair, Rob Johnson at Rob.Johnson@seattle.gov and cc all Councilmembers by emailing council@seattle.gov

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast and Webcast live onSeattle Channel 21 and on theCity Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on theCity Council website. Follow the Council onTwitter and onFacebook.

Additional News Coverage of MHA: 

Urbanist Mosqueda, González, and Juarez Push for Bigger MHA Rezones Amid Amendment Debates:https://www.theurbanist.org/…/mosqueda-gonzalez-and-juarez…/
S.C.C. INSIGHT: MHA ISSUES COME INTO FOCUS AS COUNCIL DEBATES AMENDMENTS https://sccinsight.com/2019/02/10/mha-issues-come-into-focus-as-council-debates-amendments/
Seattle Times:Here’s when the City Council could upzone Seattle neighborhoodshttps://www.seattletimes.com/…/heres-when-the-city-council…/

Should HPAC Support Camp Second Chance Permit Extension?

Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC) has been requested to support the permit extension by two community groups, Martin Westerman, Director of Seattle Green Spaces Coalition (SGSC) and CSC Community Advisory Committee. We have also received emails from neighbors about issues with encampments and RVs  in the neighborhood not being addressed.

Please take our short anonymous survey by Feb. 14, 2019 so HPAC executive committee can understand the wishes of the neighborhood in responding to this request.

Missed our listening session last week?
West Seattle Blog has video of our community listening session from last week here https://westseattleblog.com/2019/01/would-extending-encampments-stay-be-a-broken-promise-or-unique-opportunity-heres-how-highland-park-action-committees-listening-session-went/

Link to Survey: https://goo.gl/forms/jDaNye879dKO4FDC3

Background:
“Camp Second Chance is one of six encampments authorized and funded by the City of Seattle’s Human Services Department as part of the City’s emergency response to homelessness.” Founded on April, 9th 2016 – officially permitted on March 2017 by the City of Seattle. The Human Services Department extended the permit on June 7, 2018 for the Myers Way/Camp Second Chance to remain at 9701 Myers Way South for an additional 12 months, until March 2019. There is a request for a continued permit.

The Seattle Municipal Code (SMC) Section 23.42.056, Subsection E.1 states that a transitional encampment may only be permitted for 12 months at a site, with only one allowed extension for an additional 12 months. Further, SMC 23.42.056, Subsection E.2 states that a time period of 12 months must elapse after the end of the period in which a transitional encampment was sited at any property before another encampment can be permitted at that site. 

On June 7, 2018, the Seattle Human Services Department announced that the permit for siting of Camp Second Chance at the Myers Way Parcels had been extended for 12 months until March 2019 (part of that extension was applied retroactively at the time of this announcement): https://homelessness.seattle.gov/hsd-recommends-extending-permit-for-camp-second-chance-on-myers-way/

Next HPAC Meeting is February 27, 2019

Annual Meeting
Election for HPAC executive committee positions 

Please see our By-laws at https://hpacinfo.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/hpac-2018-by-laws.pdf
To nominate yourself and/or another HPAC member – please provide either via email to hpacchair@gmail.com or verbally in person at our Jan or at our annual meeting on Feb 27, 2019:

Following info: Name, position sought, email, phone, address, and up to a 75 word response to the following:

  • How much time a month can you commit to meetings and serving the mission of HPAC? 
  • What lived/professional skills, experiences, and resources would you bring to the position sought?
  • What do you like about the Highland Park community?
  • What could be one improved in Highland Park?

Positions Up for Election Include:

  1. Chairperson(s) – The duties include preside at all HPAC meetings and Executive Committee meetings, prepare agendas, report on the actions of the Executive Committee, maintain momentum of programs initiated by the HPAC. (10 -15 hours per month)
  2. Assistant/Vice Chairperson(s) – The duties include to serve in the absence of the Chairperson, to develop and encourage broader membership participation, and to plan and organize special projects and functions. Serve as liaison to Delridge District Council/Southwest District Council and other Councils as needed. (10 -15 hours per month)
  3. Secretary – The duties include notify the membership of the next meeting date, time, take the minutes of the HPAC meetings, with a summary of actions taken and assignments made ready to be presented at each subsequent meeting. (5 -10 hours per month)
  4. Treasurer – The duties include receive and disburse funds as instructed by the Executive Committee and the HPAC, works with our fiscal sponsor in record keeping, and reports on the financial position of the HPAC at each meeting. (5-10 hours per month)

All HPAC meetings are held at the Highland Park Improvement Club, 1116 SW Holden, Seattle, WA 98106 on the 4th Wednesday of the month  (from Jan – June & Sept – October) Doors open at 6:30 – Meeting from 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Neighborhood Street Fund Program 2019

HPAC is recommending the following projects for prioritization:

  • Duwamish Longhouse Pedestrian Safety & Accessibility Project
  • New Pedestrian Route between South Park and North Delridge/White Center
  • Highland Parkway Roundabout
  • Holden Street Improvements between 16th and Delridge
  • Total replacement of sidewalks along 8th avenue sw btwn. Henderson and Roxbury.

Community Prioritization phase of Neighborhood Street Fund 2019-2021 cycle is now open! 

Tell us what street improvements your community needs most by scoring projects proposed by neighbors in your district now through February 22. The highest-scored projects will proceed to the Voting phase in Spring.

How to score:
Online: prioritize projects and participate in an online dialogue with your neighbors without leaving your home!
http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/projects-and-programs/programs/neighborhood-street-fund/projects-map

In-person: attend a 90-minute Community Prioritization Meeting in your district. Meetings will include presentations by SDOT staff of each project proposed in your district. (Please note that presentations will begin promptly at the meeting start, so arrive on time! To request interpretation and or another accommodation, please contact us at: nsf@seattle.gov or (206) 733-9361before the meeting date.

3 Tips for scoring:
Plan ahead: if you will be joining a community meeting, plan accordingly to arrive no later than the meeting start time. 
Do your research: in-depth project proposals are available on our website. Get to know the projects proposed in your district prior to attending a meeting or scoring online. 
Share: invite friends, family, and neighbors to participate, even if they reside in a different district.

Ready to score?
Visit our website to score online or check the meeting schedule! http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/projects-and-programs/programs/neighborhood-street-fund/projects-map

Thank you for your continued interest in the NSF Program. We look forward to your participation!
Neighborhood Street Fund Program
http://www.seattle.gov/NSF 
If you need this information translated, please call 206-733-9361
Call: 206-733-9361.
Si usted necesita esta información traducida en español, por favor llame al 206-733-9361.
如果您需要把下列資訊翻譯成中文,請致電 206-733-9361.

Join Us for the Next HPAC Mtg Weds. 1/23/2019

Where: All HPAC meetings are held at the Highland Park Improvement Club, 1116 SW Holden, Seattle, WA 98106 on the 4th Wednesday of the month (from Jan – June & Sept – October)

Agenda as follows:

7:00p Welcome from HPAC Acting Chair Gunner Scott
7:05p Community Announcements

  • HPIC
  • Other

7:10p HPAC Executive Committee Updates

  • Elections Coming in Feb.

7:15p Camp Second Chance Request for Re-Authorization / Permit Extension Conversation

c2cThis will be a facilitated structured conversation to understand the wishes of neighbors, stakeholders, community groups, and businesses in order to inform HPAC’s response to the permit extension.

Process:

7:15p – Conversation Guidelines Presented

7:20 – 7:40p: There will be 3-4 community groups representatives presenting 5 min statements for and against the permit extension.

7:40 – 8:15p – Neighbor Attendees will be given 1-2 minutes each to present comments for consideration.

8:15p – Closing and next steps.

HPAC has been requested to support the permit extension by two community groups. We have also received emails about issues with encampments and RVs  in the neighborhood not being addressed.

“Camp Second Chance is one of six encampments authorized and funded by the City of Seattle’s Human Services Department as part of the City’s emergency response to homelessness.” Founded on April, 9th 2016 – officially permitted on March 2017 by the City of Seattle. The Human Services Department extended the permit on June 7, 2018 for the Myers Way/Camp Second Chance to remain at 9701 Myers Way South for an additional 12 months, until March 2019. There is a request for a continued permit.

After the meeting a survey will be sent out via our e-list (get your neighbors to sign up!) to also assess the neighborhood’s desire on how HPAC should proceed.

8:30p Adjourn Meeting

electionsNominations for all HPAC executive committee positions is now open

Please see our By-laws at https://hpacinfo.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/hpac-2018-by-laws.pdf
To nominate yourself and/or another HPAC member – please provide either via email to hpacchair@gmail.com or verbally in person at our Jan or at our annual meeting on Feb 27, 2019:

Following info: Name, position sought, email, phone, address, and up to a 75 word response to the following:

  • How much time a month can you commit to meetings and serving the mission of HPAC? 
  • What lived/professional skills, experiences, and resources would you bring to the position sought?
  • What do you like about the Highland Park community?
  • What could be one improved in Highland Park?

Positions Up for Election Include:

  1. Chairperson(s) – The duties include preside at all HPAC meetings and Executive Committee meetings, prepare agendas, report on the actions of the Executive Committee, maintain momentum of programs initiated by the HPAC. (10 -15 hours per month)
  2. Assistant/Vice Chairperson(s) – The duties include to serve in the absence of the Chairperson, to develop and encourage broader membership participation, and to plan and organize special projects and functions. Serve as liaison to Delridge District Council/Southwest District Council and other Councils as needed. (10 -15 hours per month)
  3. Secretary – The duties include notify the membership of the next meeting date, time, take the minutes of the HPAC meetings, with a summary of actions taken and assignments made ready to be presented at each subsequent meeting. (5 -10 hours per month)
  4. Treasurer – The duties include receive and disburse funds as instructed by the Executive Committee and the HPAC, works with our fiscal sponsor in record keeping, and reports on the financial position of the HPAC at each meeting. (5-10 hours per month)

viaduct

Reminder:  Closure of the Alaskan Way Viaduct

Commute Seattle
Phone: 206-613-3206
E-mail: SR99@commuteseattle.com
Website: www.commuteseattle.com/sr99/

Timeline

January 4, 2019 | SR 99 Stadium Ramps Close: Northbound SR 99 on-ramp from Royal Brougham Way and Southbound SR 99 off-ramp to S Atlantic Street close about one week before the full closure to allow for work on connections to the new SR 99 tunnel.

January 11, 2019 Alaskan Way Viaduct ClosesWSDOT will close SR 99 through downtown Seattle for approximately three weeks to build roadway and ramp connections, realign SR 99 and open the new SR 99 tunnel.

Early February 2019 | SR 99 Tunnel OpensThe new 2-mile stretch of SR 99 tunnel opens to traffic. After the tunnel opens the northbound off-ramp to downtown will remain closed for up to two weeks.

Early 2019 – 2020 | Alaskan Way Viaduct Removal and Related Projects: After the tunnel opens, AWV demolition begins by the waterfront, the Battery Street Tunnel will be decommissioned, and surface streets around Aurora Ave N will be reconnected.

March 2019 | Bus Service Ends in the Light Rail TunnelKing County Metro bus routes 41, 74, 101, 102, 150, 255 and Sound Transit Express Route 550 buses will no longer use the transit tunnel and will operate on surface streets, including a new transit pathway on 5th and 6th Avenues. 

2019 – 2021 | Waterfront ConstructionBuilt by the City of Seattle’s Office of the Waterfront, the new Alaskan Way street will be transformed along the waterfront with a new promenade and connections to the Pike Place Market. 

2019 | SR 99 Tunnel TollingThe SR 99 tunnel will be free to use when it opens for a period before tolling starts.  Tolling could begin as early as summer 2019.

Under construction thru 2022 | WA State Convention Center (WSCC) AdditionWSCC has launched a transformative project that will provide economic and public benefits, including affordable housing, cycling, and pedestrian improvements, and a study of lidding more of I-5 – as part of its $92 million expansion. Construction is expected to be complete in Q3 2021, with the addition open to the public in Q1 2022.

Under construction thru December 2020 | Seattle Center ArenaOak View Group (OVG) has partnered with the City of Seattle to redevelop the Arena at Seattle Center. The newly renovated Arena will be a vital asset for the residents of our region and visitors from around the world for existing and future professional sports teams, other sporting events, concerts, and shows. 

Under construction thru 2021 | Rainer Tower 2 ConstructionAt the corner of 5th Ave and Union St, Rainier Tower 2 is a new building being built in Rainier Square and will become an iconic new skyscraper on Seattle’s horizon. It will house new space for offices, retail stores, a hotel, residential units, and parking.

NOVEMBER 28 SPECIAL MEETING WITH SDOT

MEETING WITH SDOT

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

6:30 – 7:30 PM PST

Highland Park Improvement Club (1116 SW Holden St, Seattle, 98106)

 

Friends,

In October, the Seattle Department of Transportation informed the Highland Park Action Committee of proposed small changes to the intersection of Highland Park Way SW and SW Holden St to promote safety while we continue to wait for the installation of a roundabout.

Upon further consideration, neighbors determined that some of these small changes would not be beneficial, effectively cutting off access to their homes. In response, SDOT has removed the elements of concern and plans to move forward with the improvements.

Because neither HPAC nor neighbors were consulted in the original development of these plans, SDOT has offered to meet with the community to discuss the changes and listen to neighborhood concerns. This will not be a regular meeting of the Highland Park Action Committee, and will be presided over by HPAC’s Vice-Chair, Mr. Gunner Scott.

We hope you will be able to attend, but otherwise look forward to your participation at our next full HPAC meeting in January.

In the interim, I wish all the best for you and yours this holiday season.

Sincerely,

Charlie Omana
Chair, Highland Park Action Committee
hpacchair@gmail.com

Chann