Response to Camp Second Chance Permit Renewal

On June 7, 2018, the City of Seattle Human Services Department announced that the permit for Camp Second Chance would be renewed for an additional 12 months on the site known as the Myers Way Parcels.

In response, the Highland Park Action Committee issued a joint statement with the North Highline Unincorporated Area Council to outline our position on this issue and to invite the director of the Human Services Department to engage in a discussion with our communities about the impacts of the city’s homelessness policies on neighborhoods like ours.

We have played host to the city’s dubitable policies long enough without receiving commensurate recompense in the form of needed investments in infrastructure and safety. It is time for accountability. 

Please find the letter below:

June 8, 2018

Jason Johnson, Interim Director
Department of Human Services
City of Seattle
Seattle Municipal Tower – 58th fl.
700 Fifth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98124-421

Interim Director Johnson:

The neighborhoods of Highland Park and the various neighborhoods comprising the unincorporated urban area of North Highline are extremely disappointed to hear that the City of Seattle has extended the permit for Camp Second Chance for an additional 12 months at the Myers Way Parcels (Fiscal and Administrative Services PMA #4539-4542). With this extension, the camp will have effectively been present at the current site for 2 years and 8 months, easily exceeding the allowed 2 year stay duration for encampments as outlined in Seattle Municipal Code Section 23.42.056, subsection E.1.

Camp Second Chance established itself on the Myers Way Parcels on July 23, 2016 (“Myers Way Parcels,” 2016), 10 days after former mayor Edward B. Murray declared that the property would be retained by the City of Seattle for the purposes of expanding the Joint Training Facility and for expanding recreational space (“Mayor Murray announces,” 2016). Polly Trout of Patacara Community Services—the organization which would become the sponsor for the camp—is reported to have used bolt cutters to break the lock on the fence that had been securing the property (Archibald, 2017a), thereby allowing the group of campers, who had defected from SHARE Tent City 3 earlier that year (Archibald, 2017b), to trespass and establish their new camp. The status of the camp remained in limbo for some time thereafter.

In a post on her blog concerning a possible eviction of the camp, Seattle City Council member Lisa Herbold (2016), who represents the district in which the camp is located, relayed that she had “urged the Executive [branch of city government] not only to have its work guided by established public health and safety prioritization criteria, but…asked whether outreach workers have the ability to ask for more time if – in their estimation – more time would help get campers access to services.” Seattle City Council member Sally Bagshaw and King County Council member Jean Kohl-Welles, who are not representatives of the area where the camp is located, had requested from Mayor Murray that the camp not be immediately evicted (Jaywork, 2016). Within 5 months of the camp’s establishment on the Myers Way property, the Murray administration proceeded to officially sanction the encampment (“West Seattle Encampment,” 2016), thereby delaying the community’s request to have the Myers Way Parcels relinquished to the Parks and Recreation department for future development of the site in accordance with community wishes.

I want to make clear that the communities surrounding the encampment are not strangers to disadvantage. Our neighborhoods have suffered from a lack of investment going back at least a century, and from redlining in the 1930s. The lasting effects of this lack of investment in our neighborhoods are palpable to this day!

Data from the American Community Survey (5-year Series, 2009-2013) show that Highland Park (Census Tract 113) has a lower median income ($53,182) and a higher proportion of residents who identify as a race or ethnicity other than White (49.8%) than Seattle as a whole ($65,277 and 29.4%, respectively). The King County census tract immediately to the South of Highland Park, which encompasses the land area where the Myers Way Parcels are located, shows even starker demographic departures from Seattle.

Census Tract 265 overlays the southeastern-most portion of Highland Park in the City of Seattle, as well as a portion of White Center, which is part of the North Highline unincorporated urban area. There, the proportion of residents who identify as a race or ethnicity other than White increases to 60.1%, while the Median Household Income drops to $35,857.

Like most Seattleites, residents of our neighborhoods are compassionate and wish to address the homelessness crisis with empathy. However, in as much as the City claims to promote equity, we ask that neighborhoods like ours not continue to be overwhelmed with the responsibility of shouldering the burden of the City’s homelessness policies while wealthier, less diverse neighborhoods remain largely unscathed.

Over the past decade, Highland Park has hosted three encampments and served as a staging area for a proposed safe lot for individuals residing in recreational vehicles. This burden has impacted not only our neighborhood, but the neighborhoods immediately south of us along the city limit. No other neighborhood in Seattle has willingly or unwillingly taken on as much and to the same extent!

Given this history, the Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC) has sought resolution from the Human Services Department on a number of items, including

1) The adoption of a set of best practices (manifested as our “Neighborhood Protocols for Sanctioned Encampments” which have been provided to the department on many past occasions and are again enclosed below) by which the City of Seattle will abide prior to sanctioning an encampment in any given neighborhood.

2) That the Finance and Administrative Services Department accelerate the relinquishment of the Myers Way Parcels to the Department of Parks and Recreation.

3) A plan resolving jurisdictional issues that arise from the presence of sanctioned and unsanctioned encampments at the interface of city, unincorporated county, and state land.

4) A 10% increase in the number of police officers assigned to the Southwest Precinct Patrol to help mitigate the increased burden on our current resources. (At 124 Full-Time Equivalents for budget year 2018, the Southwest Precinct Patrol Budget Control Level is the lowest in the city.)

Despite a reply on April 18 from Catherine Lester, the previous director of the Human Services Department, the Highland Park Action Committee does not feel that our requests have been satisfactorily addressed. We understand that some of our requests will require coordination with other departments. However, it is our belief that the City needs to take a holistic approach to its encampment-sanctioning process. To date, the methods employed have lacked transparency and eroded neighborhood trust in city government.

In an effort to allow residents of Highland Park and surrounding neighborhoods to get a better understanding of the City of Seattle’s homelessness response, the Highland Park Action Committee invites the Director of the Human Services Department (whomever that may be at the time) to attend our scheduled meeting on September 26, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. PDT for a moderated discussion on homelessness policy.

We kindly ask for confirmation of acceptance or declination of this request by August 17, 2018.

Sincerely,

Charlie Omana
Chair, Highland Park Action Committee
206-880-1506
hpacchair@gmail.com

Liz Giba
President, North Highline Unincorporated Area Council
lgiba@northhighlineuac.org

CC: Mayor Jenny A. Durkan
Council Member Lisa Herbold, Chair: Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development and Arts
Council Member Kshama Sawant, Chair: Human Services, Equitable Development, and Renter Rights
homelessness@seattle.gov

Citations

Archibald, A. (2017a, February 22). A new kind of camp. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://realchangenews.org/2017/02/22/new-kind-camp

Archibald, A. (2017b, September 6). Camp Second Chance splits with supporting nonprofit. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://realchangenews.org/2017/09/06/camp-second-chance-splits-supporting-nonprofit

Herbold, L. (2016, July 28). In-District Office Hours, August 4 SDOT meeting on 35th Avenue SW/West Seattle Greenway, Myers Way. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://herbold.seattle.gov/in-district-office-hours-august-4-sdot-meeting-on-35th-avenue-swwest-seattle-greenway-myers-way/

Jaywork, C. (2016, August 02). City and County Councilmembers Ask Murray Not to Clear Homeless Encampment. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://www.seattleweekly.com/news/city-and-county-councilmembers-ask-murry-not-to-clear-homeless-encampment/

Mayor Murray announces planned usage of Myers Way property in Southwest Seattle. (2016, July 13). Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-murray-announces-planned-usage-of-myers-way-property-in-southwest-seattle/

Myers Way Parcels now home to encampment. (2016, July 24). Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://westseattleblog.com/2016/07/myers-way-parcels-now-home-to-encampment/

West Seattle Encampment: Mayor announces ‘sanctioned’ camp on Myers Way Parcels site. (2016, December 1). Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://westseattleblog.com/2016/12/west-seattle-encampment-mayor-proposes-authorizing-one-on-myers-way-parcels-site/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Response to Camp Second Chance Permit Renewal

  1. Pingback: REVISED JUNE 27 AGENDA | Highland Park Action Committee

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